Key #1: Clear Authorization by Program Leadership

Key #1: Clear Authorization by Program Leadership

Medical education programs are increasingly expected to educate more trainees with fewer resources. Yet, institutional leadership may worry that teaching non-technical aspects of medicine detracts from the fundamental competence of trainees. The relentless pressure on faculty and trainees to cover service and research duties is such a significant barrier to implementing an RP&L program that often only the leadership of the medical program can signal the importance of an event and allocate the infrastructure (e.g., people and protected time) to start the program, highlight its achievements, and encourage its growth.

One such example of leadership was the inauguration of our fellows’ seminar which the section chief was authorized when he sent a memo to all fellows and faculty – including research mentors – stipulating that participation by first-year fellows in the seminar was mandatory. He requested the cooperation of all faculty to ensure that fellows were given the time to participate. We reiterate this authorization as new faculty join the section.